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Veteranarians Are Telling People To Avoid Getting Flat-Faced Dogs

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They Can’t Breathe!

Vets are warning people to reconsider their decision before purchasing a dog with a fashionably flat-face. Vets said you need to be concerned about their welfare. They suffer not only from severe breathing problems but also from eye ulcers.

They are including bulldogs, French bulldogs, shih-tzus and pugs. People are buying more and more of these dogs due to their adorable squashed faces and wrinkled noses.

“We strongly encourage people to choose a healthier breed or a crossbreed instead.”

People are figuring it out, but by the time they do it’s too late. When the dogs start having health problems they find the surgery to alleviate the problem is extremely expensive.

… evidence suggests that an increasing number of the dogs – more correctly known as brachycephalic or short-muzzled dogs – are being abandoned by their owners.

Six dog rescue companies told the BBC that the breeds were being given up in greater numbers.

Battersea Dogs Home and Bluecross Animal Rescue received a total of 314 “flat-faced” dogs in 2015, compared to 226 in 2014, an increase of 39%.

So some of the rescues are starting to do surgery on the dogs to open up their breathing passageways. It’s expensive, but they say they can’t adopt them out in good conscience knowing that the poor dogs are in distress.

Steve Gosling, a vet at Battersea Dogs Home, said one of their dogs, Winston the bulldog, was a typical example.

He said: “He’s a lovely little chap, about eight years old. He was left with us by his owners and, like many dogs from this breed, he suffers from what we call brachycephalic obstructed airways syndrome.

“In other words, because he has a really short nose that we’ve bred into him, he has quite serious breathing difficulties.”

Watch video of Winston the bulldog.

The short smashed in faces and extremely broad heads seen in bulldogs and pugs is not natural. This look has been bred into the dogs using intense selective breeding techniques.

I know this will upset some dog owners, but you don’t want your dog to live their life in distress. If you own one of these breeds and they are having a difficult time breathing, you may want to consider surgery to remedy the situation.

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Article source: BBC News

Image source: Flickr – Diriye Amey

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